Accessibility to Cities

The Malaria Atlas Project (University of Oxford, United Kingdom) is proud to release the global map of accessibility to cities for the year 2015. This map, created in collaboration with researchers at Google, the Joint Research Centre of the European Union, and the University of Twente (Netherlands), is the result of multi-year project to characterize travel time to cities using cutting-edge computational capacity available via Google Earth Engine in conjunction with global datasets of unparalleled quality.

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Quantifying the contribution of Plasmodium falciparum malaria to febrile illness amongst African children

Although the prevalence of fever amongst African children is around 30%, only 10% of these fevers (and 28% of malaria-positive fevers) are actually directly attributable to malaria infection due to the high prevalence of non-malarial febrile illnesses. Suspected malaria cases in Africa increasingly receive a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) before antimalarials are prescribed. While this … Continued

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New Interactive Malaria Data Tools Released

As part of its commitment to open-access data, MAP has now made it even easier to download a wealth of malariometric data and covariates from our website with the release of the Interactive Map Tool and the Country Profiles Tool.

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2017 World Malaria Report is published using maps produced by the Malaria Atlas Project

The World Malaria Report is the World Health Organisation’s flagship malaria publication, released each year in December. It assesses global and regional malaria trends, highlights progress towards global targets, and describes opportunities and challenges in controlling and eliminating the disease.

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Estimating population coverage of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT)

Successful malaria control depends on prompt treatment with effective anti-malarial drugs. Although Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the recommended first-line treatment for P. falciparum malaria, overall deployment of the treatment has been slow, allowing the continued spread of malaria.

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Modern housing associated with reduced malaria risk in sub-Saharan Africa

Modern houses—with metal roofs and finished walls—are associated with a more than 9 percent reduction in the odds of malaria in children in sub-Saharan Africa when compared to more traditional thatched houses, according to a study published in PLOS Medicine by Lucy Tusting of the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, and colleagues at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Durham University and the University of Southampton.

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Malaria in Africa halved in 15 years

Since the year 2000, a concerted campaign against malaria has led to unprecedented levels of intervention coverage across sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding the effect of this control effort is vital to inform future control planning. However, the effect of malaria interventions across the varied epidemiological settings of Africa remains poorly understood owing to the absence of reliable surveillance data and the simplistic approaches underlying current disease estimates.

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Explore global malaria data using our custom mapping tools

Interactive Map Tool

Display time aware raster and survey point data, including malaria incidence, endemicity, and mosquito distribution. Download data and run zonal statistics using our geometry sets, or your own Shapefiles.

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Country Profiles Tool

Access malariometric data on a country by country basis. Visualise the data in graph format, and download pre-clipped rasters or survey points for a specific country.


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Introducing MAP

Our mission is to generate new and innovative methods to map malaria, to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales

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WHO Collaborating Centre

The University of Oxford has received designation as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre in Geospatial Disease Modelling.

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Acknowledgements

We are thankful to many people and organizations for contributing data, towards Malaria Risk and Blood Disorders research gathering.

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Current Research Projects