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Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) aquasalis Curry, 1932

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Habitats

Anopheles aquasalis is an opportunistic species that may be a poor competitor and may have few anti-predator defences. In areas where An. aquasalis and An. albimanus co-exist, An. albimanus will dominate suggesting that the inability of An. aquasalis to out-compete other dominant Anopheles species may be highly influential in defining its ecological requirements (as its name implies, it is generally only found in coastal areas). An. aquasalis is found in sunlit habitats containing emergent vegetation, in both brackish and fresh water. It is considered to prefer clear, still, non-polluted water such as stream pools, mangrove swamps, grass swamps, lagoons and ditches, although there are examples of it being found in turbid, slow flowing water bodies, in relatively high numbers.

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Resting and feeding preferences

Adults are opportunistic, feeding indoors or outdoors on animal or human hosts, but generally resting outdoors before and after feeding. Biting tends to begin at dusk, peaking early in the night, and tailing off as the night progresses. The time of the biting peak and bias towards endo or exophagy depends on the location. For example in Maranhão, Brazil, a tendency to bite at dusk and indoors has been observed whereas in Sucre State, Venezuela, a tendency to bite outdoors was observed, and biting peaked earlier in one village. Females have also been collected biting during the day.

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Vectorial capacity

Anopheles aquasalis is considered to be a dominant malaria vector species.

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Further details and the sources for this text can be found in

Sinka, M.E., Rubio-Palis, Y., Manguin, S., Patil, A.P., Temperley, W.H., Gething, P.W., Van Boeckel, T.P., Kabaria, C.W., Harbach, R.E. and Hay, S.I. (2010). The dominant Anopheles vectors of human malaria in the Americas: occurrence data, distribution maps and bionomic précis. Parasites & Vectors, 3:72

This text has come from multiple sources which are all listed in the above paper