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Anopheles (Anopheles) labranchiae Falleroni, 1926

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Habitats

Anopheles labranchiae larvae can be found in brackish water marshes and lagoons along the coast, although females will preferentially oviposit in fresh water including rock holes, pits, ditches, drains or canals, streams/rivers, flooded ground pools and ponds, lakes or reservoirs. Despite an ability to tolerate some salinity, An. labranchiae larvae are not generally found at sites with significant levels of organic or mineral pollutants. Larval habitats are typically described as sunlit although in Sardinia, larvae have been found in almost all suitable sites except the very densely shaded. In general, An. labranchiae larvae are found in stagnant or slow moving waters and can become very abundant in rice fields.

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Resting and feeding preferences

Overall, An. labranchiae appears opportunistic in its host choice, readily biting either humans or animals, although females can aggressively attack human hosts, and are described as persistent in their attempt to enter bedrooms during the night. Anopheles labranchiae rests inside houses, animal shelters, and, to some degree, in natural shelters, depending on the location of its blood source. High percentages (86% and 90.7%) of females engorged with human blood have been found resting inside houses whereas almost all specimens collected resting in animal shelters had fed on animals. Females hibernate in stables/animal shelters and in natural sites such as crevices and tree cavities.

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Vectorial capacity

Anopheles labranchiae is considered to be refractory to exotic strains of P. falciparum, however, there is evidence of the experimental infection of An. labranchiae females indicating a potential, albeit weak, for An. labranchiae to transmit at least some strains of African P. falciparum.

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Further details and the sources for this text can be found in

Sinka, M.E., Bangs, M.J., Manguin, S., Coetzee, M., Mbogo, C.M., Hemingway, J., Patil, A.P., Temperley, W.H., Gething, P.W., Kabaria, C.W., Okara, R.M., Boeckel, T.V., Godfray, H.C.J., Harbach, R.E. and Hay, S.I. (2010). The dominant Anopheles vectors of human malaria in Africa, Europe and the Middle East: occurrence data, distribution maps and bionomic précis. Parasites & Vectors, 3: 117

This text has come from multiple sources which are all listed in the above paper