Catchment modelling for area-averaged malaria data

Current Project

Until recently, the limited availability and low quality of routine health care data on the incidence of febrile malaria in low resource settings has meant that the vast majority of risk mapping has relied upon direct observations of parasite prevalence as a proxy for disease burden, particularly those from the large-scale Malaria Indicator Survey program. Under the leadership of Director of Malaria Risk Stratification Dr Ewan Cameron, MAP is developing a statistical framework for simultaneous estimation of malaria risk maps and health facility catchments based on a modified ‘gravity model’. Read More

Semi-mechanistic modelling for serological survey data

Current Project

As countries near malaria elimination, serological measurements become increasingly important for malaria burden estimation. MAP is working to integrate serological data within our risk mapping framework using novel semi-mechanistic models based.

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Pixel-level modelling in low burden areas

Current Project

In low burden areas of the world, surveillance data is often a more informative measurement of malaria burden than parasite rate surveys, but these data are challenging to use in pixel-level modelling. We are developing disaggregation models that use these data alongside pixel-level environmental and human covariates in order to produce high-resolution burden estimates.

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Reducing malaria transmission in Uganda through improvements to housing

Current Project
Rapid population growth in Africa requires an urgent expansion and improvement of housing options. Improving housing presents a promising opportunity for malaria control by reducing indoor exposure to mosquitoes. A new study led by Dr Lucy Tusting measures recent changes in house design in rural Uganda and evaluates their association with malaria in relation to a mass scale-up of control efforts. Read More

Accessibility to Cities

Current Project
The ease with which people are able to connect with the services, institutions, and individuals supportive of socioeconomic success, good health, and overall wellbeing can ultimately separate communities that thrive from those left behind. Regardless of recent advances in electronic and online communications, inequalities persist in physical access to resources and opportunities that are primarily concentrated in urban centres. Understanding where the largest gaps in accessibility remain is of critical importance to a broad range of policymakers, investors, and development partners. Under the leadership Dr Daniel Weiss, Director of Global Malaria Epidemiology at MAP, we offer a first, crucial step toward tracking exactly where gaps in accessibility remain in 2015 and where the world can collectively address the most fundamental inequalities still experienced today. Read More

Quantifying malaria syndromes and treatment rates

Current Project

Malaria symptoms can often be quite general, overlapping with symptoms of other diseases. Malaria Atlas Project researchers aim to quantify the prevalence of two key symptoms of malaria (fever and anaemia) across Africa, and generate a better understanding of how much malaria contributes to each of these syndromes on the continent. In addition to this, by quantifying symptomatic and asymptomatic illness from malaria, we aim to measure the treatment seeking rate and effective treatment coverage for P. falciparum malaria in Africa.

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Risk stratification for intervention planning

Current Project

MAP is conducting research into geospatial analysis for malaria risk stratification and intervention targeting. Supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), we work closely with CHAI, national malaria control programs, and other partners to maximize the utility of model outputs for national malaria control planning.

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Spatio-temporal dynamics of insecticide resistance

Current Project
Insecticide resistance in the mosquitoes that transmit malaria is increasingly recognised as one of the most important threats to malaria control. A collaboration between the Malaria Atlas Project and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine is modelling spatio-temporal patterns in insecticide resistance in order to assess the impact of resistance on malaria transmission Read More