Dr. Susan Rumisha

Postdoctoral Researcher Team: Global Malaria Epidemiology

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Susan joined MAP in 2018 as a Post-Doctoral Research Scientist and her current research is to develop spatial-temporal models on effective treatment with antimalarials against Plasmodium falciparum to demonstrate key factors and perform global predictions. Results of this analysis are essential in estimation of malaria incidence, prevalence and deaths rates due to malaria.

Susan had her first degree at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and later did a Masters in Biostatistics at Hasselt University, Belgium. In 2007-2011 she did her PhD with the Swiss Tropical Institute and the University of Basel, Switzerland focusing on development and application of Bayesian models to relate malaria transmission and mortality in Africa.

She has been working as researcher at the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in Tanzania. She provides statistical and health system expertise to the Ministry of Health and works in a close collaboration with the Tanzanian National Malaria Control Program.

Susan has a great interest of seeing how proper statistical methodologies are used to generate evidence that can answer challenging questions concerning health systems, improvement of malaria control strategies and guide decision making towards efforts to eliminate malaria globally.


Selected Biography

URLDOIRusmisha, SF, Smith, T, Masanja, H, Abdullah, S, Vounatsou, P,

Relationship between child survival and malaria transmission: an analysis of the malaria transmission intensity and mortality burden across Africa (MTIMBA) project data in Rufiji demographic surveillance system, Tanzania.

Malaria Journal. March 2014 13 124.
URLDOIRumisha, SF, Smith, T, Abdullah, S, Masanja, H, Vounatsou, P,

Modeling heterogeneity in malaria transmission using large sparse spatio-temporal entomological data.

Global Health Action. June 2014 7 22682.
URLDOIMboera, LE, Bwana, VM, Rumisha, SF, Stanley, G, Tungu, PK, Malima, RC,

Spatial abundance and human biting rate of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus in savannah and rice agro-ecosystems of Central Tanzania

Geospatial Health. May 2015 10(1): 322.
URLDOIRumisha, SF, Zinga, MM, Fahey, CA, Wei, D, Bwana, VM, Mlozi, MRS, Shayo, EH, Malima, RC, Mayala, BK, Stanley, G, Mlacha, T, Mboera, LE,

Accessibility, availability and utilisation of malaria interventions among women of reproductive age in Kilosa district in central Tanzania.

BMC Health Services Research. October 2014 14 452.